Archive for April, 2006

William and Kitty Stanford of Barbour County

William Stanford is my oldest known Stanford ancestor.  Direct evidence of his vital information remains a mystery. Census records lead me to believe that he was born in the Carolinas about 1820 and died in Alabama between 1900 and 1910.  The 1870 census shows that most people with the Stanford surname, in Barbour county, over the age of 40, were born in the Carolinas.

The power of writing this blog about my 4x great grand father and divine intervention has shown me that I indeed have direct evidence.  I just found marriage evidence.  Folks, it is strange and delightfully overwhelming at the same time.  Here is the blow by blow: Read the rest of this entry »

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Emancipated. Now Leave the State.

Below is an extract from the Acts of Alabama, 1818 to 1828, found online.  This is one of many Acts pertaining to people of color that will be posted on this blog. The original documents are at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL. 

AN ACT To authorize Leonard Abercrombie to emancipate certain slaves therein named (1821).

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama, in General Assembly convened, That Leonard Abercrombie of the county of



100 Dallas be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered to manumit and set free, a woman of colour named Fanny (alias Fanny Martin) and her ten children, Moreau, Jane, Emily, Morgan, John, Maria, Eliza, Betsey, Fanny, and Lavinia, so soon as the said Leonard Abercrombie shall have executed to the Judge of the county court of the county in which such slaves reside, and his successors in office a bond with sufficient security, to be approved of by said Judge; conditioned that said slaves, Fanny Martin, Moreau, Jane, Emily, Morgan, John, Maria, Eliza, Betsey, Fanny, and Lavinia, or either of them, shall never become chargeable to the State of Alabama, or any county or town therein; that such emancipation shall not in any manner become prejudicial to the creditors of the said Leonard Abercrombie; and that he shall remove said slaves out of this State: Provided, that if any of the persons emancipated by this act shall return into this State and remain as residents of their own accord such person or persons shall be considered to be in the same state of slavery as if this act had never passed. (Approved, Dec. 8th, 1821.)

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Daniel Reid Emancipates His Children

Below is an extract from the Acts of Alabama, 1818 to 1828, found online.  This is one of many Acts pertaining to people of color that will be posted on this blog. The original documents are at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL. 

 

An Act to authorize Daniel Reid to emancipate certain slaves therein named (1820).

 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama in General Assembly convened, That Daniel Reid, a man of color of Washington county, be, and he is hereby authorized and empowered to emancipate his two children Judah and Eliza so soon as the said Daniel Reid shall have executed to the Chief Justice of the county court of Washington and his successors in office, a bond with sufficient security to be approved of by the county court conditioned that the said slaves Judah and Eliza or either of them shall never become chargable to the state of Alabama, or any county or town within the same.

[Approved, December 11th, 1820.]

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Emancipation of Tom of Lawrence County

Below is an extract from the Acts of Alabama, 1818 to 1828, found online.  This is one of many Acts pertaining to people of color that will be posted on this blog. The original documents are at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL. 

An act to authorise Killis Walton to emancipate a negro man named Tom (1820).

Session: Annual Session, Oct – Dec 1820

Page: 80 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama, in General Assembly convened, That Killis Walton, of Lawrence county, be, and he is hereby authorised and empowered to emancipate and set free a negro man slave, aged forty years, named Tom, so soon as the said Killis Walton, shall have executed to the chairman, or chief justice of the county court of Lawrence, and his successors it office, a bond, with sufficient security, to be approved by the county court, conditioned, that said negro man slave Tom, shall never become chargeable to this State, or any county or town within the same.

 [Approved, December 11, 1820.]

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Richmond Richardson Emancipated

Below is an extract from the Acts of Alabama, 1818 to 1828, found online.  This is one of many Acts pertaining to people of color that will be posted on this blog. The original documents are at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL. 

 

An Act to authorize Lemuel Mead to emancipate a Negro man Slave named Richmond (1820).

Section 1. BE it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama in General Assembly convened, That Lemuel Mead, of the County of Madison, be, and he is hereby authorized and empowered to emancipate a certain negro man slave called Richmond Richardson, so soon as the same Lemuel Mead, shall have executed to the chief Justice of Chairman of the county court of Madison and his successors in office a bond with sufficient security to be approved by the county court, conditioned that the said negro man Richmond, commonly called Richmond Richardson, so liberated shall not become chargeable to this State, or any county or town within the same.

[Approved, Dec. 4th, 1820.]

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Eight Slaves Emancipated in Clarke County

Below is an extract from the Acts of Alabama, 1818 to 1828, found online.  This is one of many Acts pertaining to people of color that will be posted on this blog. The original documents are at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL. 

An act to authorize John Bethaney to emancipate certain slaves therein named.

SECTION 1. BE enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama, in General Assembly



[146]

convened, That John Bethaney of the county of Clarke be, and he is hereby authorized to emancipate the following slaves to wit: Lydia, a black woman, thirty-five years old; Eliza, a mulatto, aged twenty-three; Elizabeth, a mulatto, aged nineteen; William, a mulatto, aged seventeen; Daniel, a mulatto, aged fourteen; Amelia, a mulatto, aged seven, Margaret, a mulatto, aged three; and Lemuel, a quarteroon, aged one year, so soon as the said John Bethaney shall have executed to the justices of the county court of Clarke and their successors in office, a bond with sufficient security, to be approved by the said court; conditioned, that the aforesaid slaves shall never become chargeable to the state of Alabama, or any county or town therein.

(Signed) JAMES DELLET

Speaker of the House of Representatives

THOMAS BIBB

President of the Senate

Approved-November 27th, 1819

(Signed) WM. W. BIBB

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Cesar Kennedy Manumits His Family (Madison Co.)

Below is an extract from the Acts of Alabama, 1818 to 1828, found online.  This is one of many Acts pertaining to people of color that will be posted on this blog. The original documents are at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL. 

 

An act to authorize Cesar Kennedy to manumit certain of his slaves therein named. 

Session: Annual Session, Oct-Dec 1819

Page: 145 

 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama, in General Assembly convened, That Cesar Kennedy, a free man of colour, of the town of Huntsville, and county of Madison, be, and he is hereby authorized to manumit and set free his wife Hannah, and her seven children, Maria, John, Mary-Ann, William, Cesar, Rossell, and Thomas, as soon as the said Cesar Kennedy shall have executed to the chief justice or chairman of the county court of Madison county, and his successors in office, a bond with sufficient security, to be approved by said court, conditioned, that the said slaves, Hannah and her seven children, Maria, John, Mary-Ann, William, Cesar, Rossell, and Thomas, shall never become chargeable to the State of Alabama, or any county or town therein.

(Signed)


JAMES DELLET Speaker of the House of Representatives
THOMAS BIBB President of the SenateApproved-December 13, 1819

(Signed)

WM. W. BIBB

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